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12 thoughts on “Contact us

  1. Hi, I will be spending a week based in Whitby at the end of August with my 9 yo son. I try to put together a week of outdoor activities and thought that an introduction to caving would be a great way to spend a couple of hours one day. Through your establishment as a Caving Club could you possibly point me towards any organisations who offer planned, supervised and guided cave explorations suited to beginners. Any help would be appreciated. Many thanks, Rob

  2. Hello , hope you are well in a few weeks I will be visiting the north yorkshire moors and staying near to Helmsley . I have a range of activities planned for our visit in and around the moors generally all outdoor based . I am a keen walker and have 4 /5 walks planned researched but one thing seems to be eluding me a cave! Joking aside whenever I go for a short break and organise some walks i like to incorporate a few features within them and a cave is always a big draw for me, I am not talking about the serious stuff you guys take on using ropes /ladders etc. Just something to make a walk more exciting easy access have a quick look with a torch break out the thermos and on our way again are there any in your area that you think might be suitable thanks for your time and look forward to hearing from you Mark

  3. Hello Chris,

    My name is Robert Duffey and I’m working on a project for the BBC called Shakespeare on Tour to tie-in with the 400th anniversary of the Bard’s death.

    The project is part of the wider BBC’s Shakespeare celebrations in early 2016/Spring 2016. The website will look at how Shakespeare’s plays and works were transported across England through the centuries and the stories associated with them and groups of travelling players. We will be creating an online resource of over 220 stories on the bbc.co.uk website. This involves a collaboration with BBC Arts and the British Library – and has a very strong learning focus.

    I’m contacting you to enquire about the possibility of using one of the images on you website relating to the Jet Mines of Whitby for the project. It will relate to a story about a Shakespeare play that was performed for the bachelors of Whitby in Victorian times, that was thought to consist of a number of wealthy Jet merchants.

    Please could you let me know if you’d be happy for the image to be used in this way by the BBC with the appropriate accreditation to yourself and others under the image, and if so, if we could arrange to access the image from yourselves.

    I look forward to hearing from you at your earliest convenience.
    Many thanks.
    All the best

    Robert Duffey

  4. Hi,

    I am working on karst in the Jurassic and Permian limestones and the Chalk and was wondering if I could discuss this with you?

  5. Dear NYMCC,

    We were recently exploring the Jurassic Coast on the section between Staithes and Port Mulgrave. Just around the headland from the Port Mulgrave side we came across what we have later found through internet research to be the entrance to a jet mine. The mine entrance was located around 8 feet up the cliff with access provided by a rope ladder, suggesting the mine is still used. We explored the mine to about 30 feet, but had to turn back due to lack of torches and in fact any other useful equipment for this task. Although we took no images of this mine, we found another image on the internet on this site: http://www.dmap.co.uk/andy/kayak/gallery.htm (just do a page search for “jet”)

    We would be very grateful if you could tell us some more information about this mine -if it is already on your radar- or, if it is not perhaps we could accompany you for your investigation?

    Best wishes,

    Paul and Maria

    1. Thanks for getting in touch.
      I was aware of the location, but looking back at my photos it was back in
      2008 when I last visited, so i’m probably overdue a visit as things change
      can change rapidly on the coast. Were the two large sea-level holes to the
      north that didn’t require a climb still visible ?

      http://www.hidden-teesside.co.uk/2008/07/22/brackenberry-wyke-and-old-nab/

      The area between Port Mulgrave and Staithes is absolutely peppered with
      ironstone workings, so I aways thought most of the open holes on that
      stretch were due to the ironstone workings plus
      the holes do seen very large, jet workings are often in shale and of much
      smaller dimensions.

      BUT, that said the The Loop Wyke / Tell Green jet workings to the south or
      Port Mulgrave are of similar dimensions.
      http://www.hidden-teesside.co.uk/2008/08/29/loop-wyke-tellgreen-jet-workings/

      I’ve never actually been inside the specific hole you mention, back in 2008
      as you can see from my last photo on the first link, there was no rope
      ladder.
      I should be relatively easy to tell if its jet or ironstone though, as the
      ironstone bands are visible in the cliffs, whilst the jet rock sits 30ft
      above these

      Watch yourselves around the bottom of those cliffs though, they are always
      on the move and the ironstone workings are pretty much guarenteed to have
      bad air if you get in any decent distance.

  6. Hi!

    I am looking for potential caves and mines suitable for small guide-led groups (this can include vertical sections) in the North York Moors region. The only cave I know of that is suitable is Kirkdale cave, until you head further west to Goyden Pot/Manchester Hole. Potential mines that I know of are in the Nenthead region or Gunnerside. The windyDo you know of any other caves or mines in the region that would be suitable?

  7. Hi,

    I am interested in joining a local cave club and am wondering if it is possible to join NYMCC?

    Cheers,

    Darren

  8. Hi
    A brilliant website…have lost a couple of work hours reading it!!
    I read with a lot of interest your page on jet mining. we have some old jet mines and we often wonder about them- how far they go in, who worked them etc. the entrances have collapsed but it may be that they can still be accessed. if you are looking for more jet mines to explore you would be welcome to come and look at them.
    there is also some interesting information in one of the Bilsdale history books about the local jet mining there, if you haven’t already seen it (I could find out what it was called, the name escapes me!)
    kind regards
    Claire

  9. Dear all

    I’ve been out walking today on Danby Low Moor, trying to get to grips with a GPS watch that my wife bought me for Xmas. I remember finding some old shafts there when I was a lad and I found them again today. I see that you have mentioned some shafts at Clitherbeck Farm; I stumbled across something you wrote back in 2012 while I was researching some stuff earlier tonight. My point is that you may not be aware of the two shafts that I found today, they are further across the moor, south east of Clitherbeck. If you would like more info, feel free to get in touch. By the way, great site, keep up the good work! Phil.

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